The performance of your website is directly tied to the revenue you get from it. It’s a multiplication of all the work you’ve put into it. The faster your site, the more money you earn from it.

The good thing is, you have a direct influence over the performance of your WordPress website. You can make it faster by yourself, but it’s a relatively specialist task. So it could make sense to hire someone like me, who specializes in making things fast.

How many resources should you invest? It depends on the type of site. If you are running an e-commerce store, you will naturally invest more than into a one-pager about your local freelance business.

Your WordPress hosting environment is both the foundation and limiting factor of your online presence. You should choose it very, very carefully because your business rises and falls with it

You should be looking for reliable hosting, where you can test all your changes before going live. If something goes wrong, you need to be able to restore your website in one click. It should be fast and offer you all the tools to make it even faster. There also should be skilled support, in case a problem arises (and this happens more often than you would like it to, trust me).

Always Act In The Client’s Best Interest

Written by Tom Herudek
 — February 24th, 2020 — Freelancing

There is usually a gap between your know-how and that of your client. It’s based on a trivial fact: our lifespan is limited. Your client has invested productive time to gain expertise in one area (making furniture?), but not in yours. In my experience, the client might have some basic understanding of WordPress development, but this is my area of expertise. So when someone hires you to do a job, they are trusting you to act in their best interest and employ your full expertise.

If you do not know, then ghosting is: “the practice of ending a personal relationship with someone by suddenly and without explanation withdrawing from all communication.” As with freelancing, as with life: it’s all about relationships. People are happy when you respect agreements and deliver within deadlines.

With the rise of remote work, communication is more and more important. In this context, ghosting is the biggest sin a freelancer can commit. Not only will you look pretty dull, but it will damage your reputation and you will be doing yourself a disservice.

Healthy Diets For Freelancers

Written by Tom Herudek
 — September 12th, 2019 — General

Would you like to wake up full of energy and feel that way all day? What about having crystal clear thinking – free from brain fog? Want to be productive all the time? Great, you are in the right place. 

In the past 7 years, I went from being an overweight individual smoking 30 cigarettes per day, feeling almost dead by 5pm, to a sports enthusiast. I lost 30kg. I now exercise twice a day. I feel absolutely incredible the whole time I am awake. 

Do you often feel like your projects are taking much longer than you anticipated? That your hourly rate is like $15 for one hour of deep work? Is your client bleeding you with endless iterations on your project? Can’t see any light at the end of the tunnel? The bad news is that it is almost certainly your fault. The good news is: I’ve been there too and I’ve done a good portion of work to escape from this trap. Through the system I’ve created, I’m able to comfortably reach my target hourly rate and I’m willing to share my way with you through this ultimate guide. Beware, I’m not offering any magic pill here, rather ideas and systems which have been proven in the freelance field.

So I’m in the freelancing and online business game for more than a decade. Same as everyone else, I started as a rookie, making the same rookie mistakes, which were then reflected in my monthly earnings (or absence of them). A typical mistake is starting the work without receiving payment from the client. I’ll show you how doing this will cost you thousands of dollars in the long run. And yes, I have the exact numbers.

Personally, for projects under $1,000, I require 100% of the payment upfront. For bigger projects, I define milestones with the client and the payments arrive in chunks, but are still paid in advance.

For me, a Productive Hour means 60 minutes of uninterrupted deep work with a full focus on the given task. If I’m interrupted or just pause (answering team mate’s question, lunch, etc), then I’m stopping the timer for this task and track it as a “not-productive” time. My daily average for development is around 4.5 productive hours and I can push myself to do 8 – 9 hours when doing a less mentally demanding activity.